books

Mimi Matthews

Books

The Viscount and the Vicar’s Daughter (2018)

 

 

The Viscount and the Vicar’s Daughter (2018)

Set in England in 1861.

Tristan Sinclair, Viscount St. Ashton is a rake bored with his life. Valentine March is a vicar’s daughter, left on her own after the death of her father. When Tristan finds Valentine weeping in the Folly at a house party, he wants to walk away, but discovers not one of the ladies he expected to see but instead a young, ill-dressed ladies companion.

This is a non-boinking book, which I appreciated. It’s also rather short, so be aware of that.

What I particularly liked is that Tristan has to overcome his past. That’s unusual for that time, when it was acceptable for a man to have mistresses, but if a young woman was found alone with a man she was ruined.

I also liked that although Tristan had a terrible reputation, he hadn’t actually been living down to that reputation in the year prior to that book. So Valentine didn’t save him, she just pulled him out of himself.

Also:

What must, under better circumstances, be a rather enviable porcelain complexion was splotchy with weeping and her perfectly proportioned little nose shone red as a beacon.

I also liked that although Tristan was at odds with his father, his father had grounds for being unhappy, and was complex in his own right.

This was a man who’d buried a much-beloved wife. A man who’d seen his youngest son return from fighting in the Crimea, damaged almost beyond repair.

And as I said, he was pretty right about Tristan.

All the things his father had said to him during that excruciating lecture in the library last night were true. His manners were execrable. His language did belong in the gutter. And he had handled Valentine March like a tavern doxy instead of a gently bred vicar’s daughter.

The negative about this story was that the main characters fell in love almost instantly, and never truly got to know each other before their HEA. They did get to know their own selves, but I think they needed more time with each other before I’d really believe a HEA.

Publisher: Perfectly Proper Press
Rating: 6.5/10