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The Gentle Art of Fortune Hunting

Tuesday, March 2, 2021

The Gentle Art of Fortune Hunting (2021) K.J. Charles

The Gentle Art of Fortune HuntingSet in Historical London

Robin Loxleigh and his sister Marianne have come to London to seek their fortunes, each seeking a wealthy spouse.

Unfortunately for Robin, the young lady he has set his sights for, has a very protective uncle who is determined to prove that Robin is nothing more than a a fortune hunter.

Robin and his sister are maintaining themselves in London primarily through Robin’s skill with cards–the money the need to be dressed properly and seen in all the right places.

John Hartlebury is fiercely protective of his sister and his niece, and as much as he loves his niece, he doesn’t believe an attractive young man would court her unless he knew she had an inheritance–and no one is supposed to know she has an inheritance.

So he looks into Robin.

Wins fifty or sixty pounds a night.”

“That’s not huge.” It was vast amounts by normal standards, of course, entire sections of the annual accounts to John Hartlebury the prudent brewer, but mere tokens to a gaming baronet.

“It’s not breaking the bank, no. It’s the kind of money you can win at a gaming hell without attracting too much attention. The question is how many gaming hells he’s winning sixty pounds a night at, and how often.”

What he sees he doesn’t like, and so is determined to get Robin away from his niece at all costs.

“You seem a devoted pair.”

Loxleigh looked up from his hand. “I dare say domesticity is mocked in sophisticated company, but in truth, I don’t care. It has been the two of us for a long time. Marianne deserves everything London has to give her, and she will have it if I have anything to say to the matter.”

His hazel eyes were different when he said that. Alive, but not smiling, not smiling in the least. Hart watched him as he looked down at his cards again, and thought, So that’s what you look like when you’re telling the truth.

This is a very sweet story, however it’s enemies to lovers which–is a trope I quite frequently have problems with. That isn’t to say that it’s done badly, it’s just doesn’t work for me. Which means much of the first part of the story–where Robin and Hart are sparring and dancing around each other–was problematic for me.

What did work was that both were incredibly protective of their families, and were obviously willing to do absolutely anything to keep them from coming to harm–in any way they could. For Robin this meant cheating and cards if necessary, and looking for a young lady with a fortune to marry–even though Robin himself had no interest in women–young or otherwise.

I may not have liked the way either man acted in some instances, but I couldn’t fault why they were doing what they could. And both had a history that made them especially protective. And really, for all he was acting the scoundrel, Robin had the greater natural compassion, which made it hard for me to be mad at his actions.

It was a good story, but because of the enemies to lovers trope, I don’t think it will end up being one of my favorites.

Publisher : KJC Books
Rating: 8/10

Categories: 8/10, British, Historical, LGBT, Romance, Sexual Content     Comments (0)    



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