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Martha Wells

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The Death of the Necromancer (1998)

 

 

The Death of the Necromancer (1998)

Death-NecromancerNicholas Valiarde wants more than anything in the world to avenge the death of his foster father.

The fact his foster father was hung for practicing necromancy (a charge that was proved, to late, to be false) doesn’t cause Nic to hesitate. Nor does the fact that Inspector Rosarde, the very man whose testimony lead to the conviction of his foster father, seems to be close to discovering the true identity of Donatien, Nic’s second identity as a criminal mastermind.

Nicholas had learned early that on of the chief problems in deception was the tendency to try to over explain one’s actions. The truth was that people did the oddest things for the most inconsequential reasons and elaborate justifications only made one look guilty.

Also, we find Madeline, actress and Nic’s love, Reynard, the disgraced cavalry officer, and various other individuals loyal to Nic.

The story is sent in a world that somewhat parallels Europe in the 1800s, but not quite, and with magic. To be honest, I’m rather fond of the setting, since it lets one pick and choose from the various qualities and ideas of the time. (Women seem far less to be considered chattel, which is a nice change, as is the more accepting attitude towards homosexuality.)

It also has some of the manners, which are always fun.

“But you’re still the heir to the Alsene properties.”
“Like being the heir to Hell, only less glamorous.”

It was a somewhat slow read, but I did enjoy it.
Rating: 8/10

Published by Martha Wells